SAFE AND BEST PRACTICE CARDIAC IMAGING SERVICES

Page last updated: 30 June 2020

Factsheet - Cardiac Imaging Services Changes - 1 August 2020 (PDF 203 KB)
Factsheet - Cardiac Imaging Services Changes - 1 August 2020 (Word 79 KB)

Flow diagrams - Cardiac Changes - 1 August 2020 (PDF 671 KB)

Presentation for Webinar - Cardiac Imaging Services - 1 August 2020 (PDF 4552 KB)

Quick Reference Guide - Changes to Cardiac Imaging - ECG and AECG Services (PDF 404 KB)
Quick Reference Guide - Changes to Cardiac Imaging - ECG and AECG Services (Word 115 KB)

Quick Reference Guide - Changes to Cardiac Imaging - Echo and MPS (Nuclear Medicine) Services (PDF 558 KB)
Quick Reference Guide - Changes to Cardiac Imaging - Echo and MPS (Nuclear Medicine) Services (Word 127 KB)


The Australian Government is making changes to Medicare-funded cardiac imaging services to support high-value care and ensure patients have access to the most appropriate tests for their individual symptoms and conditions. This is the first phase of the Government’s response to cardiac recommendations from the Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS) Review Taskforce.


What are the changes?
From 1 August 2020 changes will be made to MBS items for cardiac imaging services to better clarify the clinical requirements and circumstances where this testing and repeat testing is appropriate. These changes will promote high-value use of electrocardiogram (ECG), echocardiogram, ambulatory ECG, ECG stress testing, myocardial perfusion studies and stress echocardiogram.


Why are these changes being made?
The changes to cardiac imaging services aim to improve the quality of care, encourage high value care and reflect current best practice.

The changes were recommended by the MBS Review Taskforce to ensure appropriate cardiac imaging services are provided to patients.

These changes were recommended by the Taskforce following an extensive period of stakeholder consultation and consultation with the sector that uses these items.

The changes clarify when tests should be performed, ensuring testing is only performed where there is a clinical need. This reduces patient’s exposure to unnecessary testing. In relation to myocardial perfusion studies this will also reduce unnecessary exposure to radiation


What does this mean for patients?
Patients will benefit by only having cardiac services when clinically necessary, that are performed safely in a way that aligns with clinical best practice and billed in a consistent manner.


What does this mean for providers?
Providers will benefit from a clear schedule of MBS items that are aligned with best practice. There will be financial impacts for providers currently delivering large numbers of unnecessary repeat tests.

Providers will receive further information closer to the implementation date.


What other changes will there be to cardiac items?
Further consultation on other (procedural) Taskforce recommendations will occur over the coming months to inform a Government response.

These consultations will ensure the changes deliver quality and affordable care for patients, while supporting implementation in a way that safeguards timely and appropriate access for all Australians.

Further details will be available on www.mbsonline.gov.au


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